Nutrition

You Want Me to Eat a Fungus?

Mushrooms, technically speaking, are the fleshy, fruiting body of a fungus. Not so enticing so far, right? But, they are quite versatile. Some have a meaty texture and can be added to dishes to reduce or eliminate meat and calories, assuming you have another source of protein. One cup of raw sliced mushrooms has only…

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Vitamin C Revisited – Food Sources and Recipes

Vitamin C A recent Health Pearl by Dr. Tran noted that Vitamin C can have one positive effect on the body that is related to heart disease. It can decrease endothelia-1, which can constrict blood vessels. The article mentioned that Vitamin C, like exercise, can decrease this level. Of note, however, is that Vitamin C itself has…

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What Do Back Pain, Erectile Dysfunction and Heart Disease Have in Common?

More than you would think, it turns out. A few weeks ago, I attended a conference about Nutrition in Medicine that focused on prevention of cardiovascular disease. It was hosted by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and George Washington University in Washington, D.C.In 2013, their conference focused on nutrition and the brain, showing how…

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Mediterranean Diet: New Orleans Style

New Orleans is a “foodie” city for sure.  Fresh seafood, ripe ingredients, fragrant spices and cultural diversity add to the distinct properties of its culinary uniqueness.  Having studied topics in culinary medicine and taken cooking classes at the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, which is part of the Tulane School of Medicine,  I understood the initiative for exploring the…

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Hats Off To The Washington Post: Forget the Fitbit. Focus on Lunch.

A comical drawing of a young man exercising on the front of the Outlook Section of today’s Washington Post caught my eye. As did the title: Forget the Fitbit. Focus on Lunch. It is written by a cardiologist who is a consultant clinical associate to the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges in Britain. I am simply…

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How To Get More Whole Grains In Your Life

Most articles you read about healthy nutrition mention the benefits of eating a Mediterranean diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, with some low-fat dairy, and healthy fats, particularly those contained in nuts. Often, foods rich in whole grains will keep you feeling fuller longer.  So, indirectly, increasing your whole grains may help you…

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The Good News About Avocados – or Alligator Pears

Sometimes called “alligator pears,” avocados are shaped like pears and have tough, green and bumpy skin, which resembles alligator skin. They are fatty fruits, not vegetables, and come from the avocado tree, known as Persea americana, which is native to Mexico and Central America. Easy to incorporate into one’s diet, they are tasty and versatile….

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The Mediterranean Diet : Delicious Food Prescriptions for Transforming Disease and Illness Workshop: Lecture, Booksigning, Cooking Demo and Lunch with Chef Amy Riolo

Lady Docs had the opportunity to host a lunch where health care professionals could learn more to advise patients on eating a Mediterranean Diet to improve longevity, quality of life and prevention of disease.  We were privileged to host internationally known speaker and author Chef Amy Riolo who lectured on the scientific research done on…

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A Note of Caution Regarding Infant and Toddler Foods

A study published in the March 2015 issue of Pediatrics reminds us, as parents and pediatricians, that not all food products designed for toddlers are healthy choices. The researchers set out to evaluate the sodium and sugar content of a variety of foods targeted for infants and toddlers. After examining labels of over a thousand…

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Peanuts Getting a Bad Rap?

Eating peanuts might actually reduce the incidence of developing peanut allergies, according to a new studypublished in The New England Journal of Medicine. The study which began in 2006 followed 640 children over four years, at  a time when current pediatric practice was to keep high-risk children away from peanut products for the first three years of life….

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