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This is definitely one of those topics that only gets more confusing the more you read. So, you need to have a philosophy about it and fit each new bit of information into your overall framework. That way, you're not constantly reeling from 'no carbs' to 'low fat' to 'grapefruits only' to whatever is in. Among physicians, there isn't any consensus about what is best for you. The only thing we can probably agree on is that no one diet suits everyone. In this section, over time, we hope to provide enough helpful information so you can make healthful decisions on your own.

In a nutshell, my philosophy is that fruits, vegetables, and whole grains should make up most of your intake. Lean protein such as fish, chicken, turkey or tofu, nuts, lentils. and beans should comprise the rest. The most important to me is eating 'whole foods' as they come out of the ground and limiting processed foods as much as possible. The food industry has studied and perfected combining the most tempting, and at times addictive, combinations of fat, salt, and sugar in restaurant and supermarket offerings. They know how to keep you coming back for more.

Varying what you eat can keep your meals interesting. I aim to include 'superfoods' such as spinach, tomatoes, pumpkin, blueberries, and hemp seed, which I think are delicious. Experiment with foods that contain antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E, lycopene (think tomatoes), and beta-carotene (pumpkin and carrots). These and many others are beneficial when eaten in 'whole foods' but not when taken in pill form.
Of course, not one nutrition plan suits everyone, since food preferences or intolerance and medical issues must be considered.

But for the majority of people, if you eat whole foods and nourish your body and soul with a wholesome variety of nutritious foods, your mind and body will thank you. Often, people don't realize that fatigue, insomnia, depression, and other issues are closely tied to what we eat. In our posts in this section, we'll provide some practical information and keep you posted on the latest and greatest in nutrition news. Send us your questions!

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Coronation of a Virus: While Preparing for it, Do Not Forget to Live

I don’t remember how many weeks that, whenever I wake up and turn on the TV for news of the day while preparing for work, I have been bombarded with statistics on how many people have died around the world from Coronavirus, and how many more people were diagnosed with this specific strain, Covid-19.  My…

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A Community Pediatrics Bulletin: Asking Saves Kids from Gun Violence

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) defines community pediatrics as the “practice of promoting and integrating the positive social, cultural and environmental influences on children’s health.” Traditional clinical pediatrics is not sufficient to take on problems such as gun violence, high infant mortality rates, obesity, or exposure to lead and other environmental hazards. Community pediatricians…

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Rooting Out Implicit Bias in Pediatric Practice

In my 2017 LadyDocs Corner Cafe blog, “Let’s Talk About Racism,” I introduced my first experiences grappling with racism. I’m happy to report back after the 2019 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) annual meeting that many pediatricians, myself included, are freer from both intentional (explicit) and unintentional (implicit) acts of interpersonal racism and sexism. I…

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Grief and the Holidays

written by Julie Bindeman, PsyD To be human means to experience loss. With loss comes feelings of grief, as loss and love go hand and hand. We mourn what we once cared about. As the holidays come upon us, feelings of loss can be confusing during what is typically thought of as a happy time of…

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Trauma and the Holidays

The holiday season can be a time for gratitude, peace, love, and joy. It can also be a time of stress, pressure, intense trigger responses, depression, and anxiety. For those who are going through or have experienced trauma, the latter is more likely. Survivors of domestic abuse, sexual violence or harassment, incest, stalking, and bullying…

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Challenging Family Scripts and Setting Healthy Boundaries During the Holidays

As a marriage and family therapist, I was asked to speak at a recent Lady Docs gathering about family interactions that play a prominent role during this holiday season.  Feel free to journal as the group did last week as we explore family relationships. As therapists, we treat people as part of a family system…

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2019 National Race to End Women’s Cancer

This morning, my husband and I and several friends met at Freedom Plaza in Washington D.C. for our third 5K run/walk for National Race to End Women’s Cancer, to support the Foundation for Women’s Cancer.  Gynecologic cancers include Ovarian, Cervical, Endometrial/Uterine, Vulva and Vaginal Cancer.  According to the American Cancer Society statistics, there were 110,070…

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A walk in the gardens – just what the doctor ordered

There are always things that need to be done.  But, sometimes peace and quiet in nature is just what the doctor ordered.   Our last exercise post was about the benefits of exercise – 150 minutes of mild to moderate exercise each week.  Prior posts touted the importance of walking for osteoporosis prevention.   We know that being outdoors…

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Helping Others – Tips Related to Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month

It seems that every cause has a day, week or month to bring awareness and that we can be inundated with these messages. With that in mind, this post is about an issue that most people don’t talk much about or know how to respond to: pregnancy and infant loss. October signifies the awareness of…

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The Gastric Cancer that Never Was

This blog probably will be among the longest ones you have seen from me.  I often warn my women friends whenever I write a long email, to tell them what I think about the week, from political news to social issues to all the “interesting” events happening to me that week.  I advise them to…

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